Joel Edgerton Admits He Wasn’t The Friendliest Kid Back In High School



Joel Edgerton's new thriller "The Gift," which he wrote, directed and stars in, explores what happens when an old grudge compels a high school acquaintance to come back to haunt a young married couple. When Edgerton stopped by HuffPost Live on Tuesday to discuss his role in the film, he remembered the ups and downs of his own high school years.


"To be honest, like in the development of the script, I had to really remember my high school years and go, 'There were times where I wasn't a good person.' There were times where I felt the threat of navigating school, trying to avoid certain people who were bullying me. So I could understand both sides of the coin," he told host Josh Zepps.


While Edgerton said his school life closely resembled the '80s coming-of-age hit "The Wonder Years," he admitted he wasn't always the straight-laced Kevin Arnold character.


"I wouldn't call myself a bully. I wasn't like your typical [kind of bully who was] waiting around the corner to try to steal some kid's lunch or whatever, but I remember being part of that pack mentality, which is all fear-based," he said. "It's like if I can be part of the group, then I'll survive. And if I'm part of the group, unfortunately sometimes it means excluding other kids. That's definitely a form of bullying."  


Watch the full HuffPost Live interview with "The Gift" actor and director Joel Edgerton here


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Tina Fey Thinks Donald Trump Is ‘Great For Comedy’

In 2008, Tina Fey proved that comedy and politics are pretty much indistinguishable. Now, as the 2016 primary fights heat up, she thinks the latest crop of candidates could prove just as entertaining.


At a Television Critics Association summer press tour event for her Netflix series "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt," Fey said she thinks Donald Trump's presidential bid makes particularly good joke fodder.


"It's great for comedy," she said at the Tuesday morning panel. “It’s one of those things where I’m sure ‘Saturday Night Live’ wishes they were on the air right now … next year at this time you’ll be doing a panel with just Darrell Hammond.”


Fey said she doesn't yet have "fully formed jokes” about the 2016 race, but if history teaches us anything, it's that Tina Fey may once again single-handedly alter the course of human events. 




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‘The Bachelorette’ Season 11 Finale: Kaitlyn Bristowe Chooses Shawn Booth, Finds (Reality TV) Love


It's 2015. By now, reality TV is a young adult, but it hasn't grown out of "The Bachelor" franchise. Despite its bizarre dating rituals, low success rate, and questionable racial and gender politics, the stable of shows is, if anything, more popular than ever. Do people love "The Bachelor" and "The Bachelorette," or do they love to hate it? It's unclear. But here at "Here To Make Friends," we both love and love to hate them -- and we love to snarkily dissect each episode in vivid detail.


In this week's "Here To Make Friends" podcast, hosts Claire Fallon, Culture Writer, and Emma Gray, Senior Women's Editor, recap the finale of "The Bachelorette," Season 11. We'll discuss Nick's rejection, Shawn's proposal and the awkward couples therapy that was "After The Final Rose." 




 


Plus, Sam Usher and Sammy Smith, also known as two-thirds of The Bachelor Dudes, join to give us their "Bachelorette" finale commentary.  




The best tweets about the "Bachelorette" finale...


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‘Conan’ Is Being Sued For Allegedly Stealing Jokes From Twitter


Conan O'Brien, his production company and TBS are being targeted in a lawsuit claiming the talk show host's jokes were stolen from a man's Twitter account and blog.


In a lawsuit filed in California on July 22, comedy writer Robert Kaseberg claims that "Conan" allegedly violated copyright on four of his jokes between January and June of 2015. But Conaco, Conan O’Brien’s production company, and "Conan" announcer Andy Richter aren't having any of it.


In a statement released on Monday, a rep for Conaco told Entertainment Weekly, "We at Conaco firmly believe there is no merit to this lawsuit." Richter also commented on the news. On Monday, Richter joked about the allegations, writing, "There's no possible way more than one person could have concurrently had these same species-elevating insights!"





The first joke on which the lawsuit claims "Conan" violated copyright was published on Kasenberg's blog on Jan. 14, 2015. In the joke, Kasenberg writes, "A Delta flight this week took off from Cleveland to New York with just two passengers. And they fought over control of the armrest the entire flight." As The Hollywood Reporter points out, O'Brien told a similar joke about a Delta flight that same day.


According to the lawsuit, Kaeberg also wrote a Tom Brady joke on his blog and Twitter on Feb. 3, 2015 that he claims was stolen. Kaseberg wrote, "Tom Brady said he wants to give his MVP truck to the man who won the game for the Patriots. So enjoy that truck, Pete Carroll." The next day, a similar joke appeared during O'Brien's monologue. The two other jokes mentioned in the complaint were on the topics of Caitlyn Jenner and the Washington Monument, separately.


The lawsuit comes after recent news that Twitter is cracking down on stolen tweets. and allowing users to claim copyright infringement. View the full complain against "Conan" here.


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Olsen Twins Possibly Toying With The Idea Of Appearing On ‘Fuller House’


Did John Stamos manage to guilt trip Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen into appearing on the upcoming "Full House" reboot, aptly titled "Fuller House?" 


Maybe. 


Stamos first publicly called "bullshit" on the sisters after they told Women's Wear Daily they weren't in the loop regarding the new show. The discord didn't last long, however, as the actor soon tweeted he worked things out after he had a "sweet talk" with Mary-Kate -- though he was unable to convince the twins to sign on. Still, the idea of a "Full House" reunion without the original Michelle Tanner apparently left Stamos, who is also producing the series, "#heartbroken." It turns out that all of this prodding might have been enough to convince the Olsen twins to make an appearance on the series. 


Netflix Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos offered a sliver of hope to reporters at the  Television Critics Association’s press tour on Tuesday, saying the Olsens were "teetering" on their decision to appear on the show: 





"There’s a bunch of opportunity for them if they choose to. But they’re not in the current creative," Sarandos added. 


Executive producer Robert L. Boyett had previously confirmed that the twins would not be appearing when he released a statement in May


As the sisters "teeter" with their decisions, the rest of the original cast of the ABC series have signed on to reprise their roles on the Netflix reboot, which will focus on Candace Cameron Bure's D.J. Tanner, who is now a widow with three kids.


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Tyrese Gibson Calls Out ‘White’ Radio Stations For Being Racist



Tyrese Gibson's new album "Black Rose" may be No. 1 right now, but that doesn't seem to be helping him get any airplay. 


TMZ released a video in which the 36-year-old explains his qualms with mainstream radio stations, calling out DJs like Ryan Seacrest and Elvis Duran for not playing his latest single, "Shame."


"I got an issue with mainstream radio right now," he said. "I don't create limits for myself so I don't appreciate mainstream [radio] not playing my song." 


He then goes on to say that when artists like Justin Timberlake and Sam Smith release a song, it gets played across all channels, including "urban" stations. 


"If I'm No. 1 ... my song deserves to be heard by the world," he continued. 


Last week the singer penned an open letter (published on Facebook) to Seacrest and Duran expressing these same sentiments.


"How is it possible that urban radio plays Robin Thicke, Justin Timberlake and Sam Smith when they release R&B soul records and when we're singing in the EXACT same genre, WE don't get ANY love on the other side ... ??" he wrote. 


"Do you have any idea how HARD it is to get your songs ON urban radio? Or to land a BET nomination? We have to work our ASSES OFF for every spin!" Tyrese continued, noting that his tune "Shame," featuring Jennifer Hudson, deserved to be heard worldwide.


"I won't stop or rest until we get there ... ‪#‎King‬," he finished.


You can read the letter in its entirety below. 



Open letter to Mr Ryan Seacrest of Kiss FM and Mr Elvis Duran of Z-100. Since you don't want to respond, let's turn...

Posted by Tyrese Gibson on Saturday, July 18, 2015

While we definitely see where Tyrese is coming from -- who wouldn't want want their song played on mainstream radio? -- a look at the playlists at both stations (Z-100 and KIIS FM) he named shows they do play music by black artists (Omarion, OMI, and Wiz Khalifa among them). "Hit" stations like the two mentioned do seem to cater to specific audiences who seem to love the same 10 songs (ugh) no matter what else gets released, though, which can be difficult to break into as an artist trying to get their song on the radio. 


But at least Tyrese can rest happy knowing he has a No. 1 single on his hands, which he got without the help of mainstream radio. Some airplay would surely be appreciated, though.



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Keith Richards Still Smokes A Joint ‘Regularly’ In Morning

Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards, 71, still likes to wake and bake.


But he's fussy about where the weed comes from.


"I smoke regularly, an early morning joint. Strictly Californian," The Independent reports the musician told Mojo magazine for its September issue.





Richards, who is currently promoting his solo album "Crosseyed Heart," also remarked on the spread of marijuana legalization in the United States.


"One of the most pleasant things to watch is a map of America where it goes, green ... green ... green ... green," The Independent reports he said. "Whether it’s a good thing in the long run, I don’t know."


Richards has a well-documented history of drug use, but wrote in his 2010 autobiography, Life, that he'd given up the hard stuff: "People think I’m still a goddamn junkie. It’s 30 years since I gave up the dope! Image is like a long shadow. Even when the sun goes down, you can see it."


H/T Uproxx


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Enough People in the World Make You Feel Like Sh*t. Don’t Help Them.

By the time I turned 30, I had written 17 episodes of an iconic television show ("Lizzie McGuire"), been nominated for two Emmys, had an agent, a manager and a size-6 body that I could cram into all sorts of fun outfits.

By the time I turned 35, I was near-broke, hadn't had a writing job in 18 months and was working the front desk of the spinning gym that I had formerly been a customer at.

"Drugs?" one of the clients asked me.

Had I been inhaling too much of the shoe disinfectant? Excuse me?

"Someone told me you used to be a TV writer. And now you work here. Was it cocaine?"

I handed her a towel and smiled. "Nope," I told her, "I never earned cocaine money."

She waited, hoping that I would spill my secret to my failure. Con artist boyfriend? Affair with the married boss? Pyramid scheme?

"Have a nice day," I told her, and helped the next client in line.

The years 2006-2009 were a vast wasteland of work. There was a manager who gave me the overall note "rewrite it for Ashton Kutcher." There was the agent who got offended at an abortion joke in a script and stop returning phone calls. My bosses who had previously hired me were out of work themselves. There was the Writers' Strike. A perfect shitstorm.

Still, I was lucky. I had just married my husband. I had insurance. We had a cheap place to live, even if it was in a moldering, mouse-infested apartment under our landlady who was a hoarder.

But I was no longer a professional TV writer.

Total Number of Writers Reporting Earnings in 2009: 4522
Total Number of TV Writers Reporting Earnings in 2009: 3166
(Source: WGA 2014 Financial Report)


I scoured the Internet for writing jobs. Entertainment Careers, eLance, Craigslist. I submitted bids, took writing tests. I scored a ghostwriting gig which had me churning out a book in eight weeks. I wrote a comic book for a Nigerian billionaire who took eight weeks to pay me $200 because he was waiting for investors. I wrote press releases for a bipolar business owner on a drug binge  --  he did have cocaine money, though always had an excuse why he couldn't pay me.

I felt like a failure. I probably looked like a failure. Let's just say I was a failure. But with every new humiliation, at least you're writing.

I continued to blog. I got a Twitter account. I got on Tumblr. I heard that a network executive thought I was "girl funny" but couldn't write for boys. In retaliation, I wrote a spec script called "Max & Trevor" about two teen dorks who just want to touch a boob. I didn't have representation. I emailed it to the last few people I knew, who patted me on the head and said nice job. I knew it was a long shot, so I tucked it away and went back to spraying rented spinning shoes. You'd think that people who earned enough money to pay $20 a spinning class would cough up $100 to purchase their own pair of spin shoes, but you'd be wrong. Instead for $2 they'd rent shoes, which were like bowling shoes that someone had run a marathon in.

My old "Lizzie McGuire" boss called me up and asked me if I was still doing "that Internet thing." During my years on "Lizzie" I had been blogging, and was always being dragged into meetings regarding Lizzie's digital presence. "Yes, I am," I told him. "I may have something for you," he responded.

The project was called "Valemont," and he wanted me to write all of the online material, as well as an ARG. I nodded. I could totally do that.

When I went home, I googled what an ARG was.

I had no idea what I was doing, but I knew that I had about eight to 12 weeks to figure it out, quick. I worked 12 hours a day. When the project went live, I worked 15 to 18 hours a day.

My boss sent my work to an agent he knew. He passed. My boss' assistant said she knew a manager who was looking for new clients. I got a meeting. The manager worked for herself. There was no fancy office, no plush carpets and walls of thick glass, no assistant whose heels clicked over the marble as she offered you a bottle of water.

She had read "Max & Trevor," a script I never expected anyone to see. She wanted to represent me. I said yes.

"Valemont" won awards for the online component. I was asked to speak at conferences at MIT, in New York, in Sweden.

I was still unemployed.

I worked on a couple of more online projects. While I had the contacts, my manager made me a deal that was much better than the one I would have made on my own.

I continued to write.

I got a meeting at a production company who had was waiting to hear about a show pickup at Nickelodeon. The show got picked up. The exec told us it was a long shot. The EP was hiring most of the people he knew from other projects.

I got a meeting.

The EP told me he read five pages of my script, then put it down, knowing that he had already decided to meet me. When he was done going through the slush pile, he told me I went back to your script because I wanted to see how it would end.

I got the job on "How to Rock."

"How to Rock" ended and then I got a consulting job on "House of Anubis."

I got an email  --  a producer friend of mine was reading my Twitter and thought I was funny  -- was I interested in appearing on the Brit List on BBC?

I developed with Disney Animation and Cartoon Network. I pitched shows to Amazon, to Dreamworks Animation, to Disney Channel, to Nickelodeon. I had a project optioned at Hasbro. I worked at Mattel on Monster High and DC Superhero Girls. A producer brought me a book that I adapted into a screenplay pitch that has a production company on board. I developed a movie with my old "Lizzie McGuire" EP and Disney Interactive. I punched up friend's pilots. I have a super-secret project that is about to be pitched that may have everyone flipping their collective lid.

But none of these things could end up happening. Because life.

There is an arbitrary line in the sand that we give ourselves:

By [age] I will have figured out [giant, important thing.

By 26 I will have figured out my career.

By 32 I will have figured out my love life.

By 41 I will have figured out my health.

This is a mathematical equation that is near-impossible to solve. Because all of the big stuff: work, love, health, involves hard work, yes, but it also needs a little bit of luck to make it through. (It bears noting that a heaping spoonful of privilege -- that I, as a cis white woman have -- also helps a ton.)

Total Number of Writers Reporting Earnings in 2014: 4899
Total Number of TV Writers Reporting Earnings in 2014: 3888
(Source: WGA 2014 Financial Report)


This is far from a cautionary tale. Partly because my tale is far from over and partly because there wasn't really anything that I could have done to pull out of the nosedive that my career took in the mid-2000s. It was a Rube Goldbergian series of unfortunate events that landed me in a dark cubby spraying rented spin shoes for the 1 percent.

William Goldman famously said about the entertainment industry that nobody knows anything. They still don't. The only thing you can do is do the work. Write like nobody's watching. Because chances are they aren't.

Until they are.

Anyone who says they've got it all figured out is just trying to make you feel bad. And there are enough people in the world who want to make you feel like shit. Don't help them.


This post originally appeared on Medium.

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Mariah Carey To Receive Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame


NEW YORK (AP) -- Mariah Carey will receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame next week.


The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce announced Monday that Carey will get the 2,556th star on Aug. 5. Guest speakers will include directors Lee Daniels and Brett Ratner, as well as Epic Records CEO and longtime Carey collaborator L.A. Reid.


Carey is one of the most successful acts in music. She has 18 No. 1 hits on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, sold millions of albums and won a number of awards, including five Grammys.


She recently launched a residency in Las Vegas where she performs her No. 1 hits, including "Vision of Love," "Hero" and "We Belong Together."


 


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In 1988, Oprah Asked Donald Trump If He’d Ever Run For President. Here’s How He Replied.



Donald Trump wasn't always so sure he wanted to run for president.


Long before The Donald officially kicked off his polarizing 2016 run and became the Republican frontrunner, Oprah asked the business tycoon about his political aspirations on a 1988 episode of "The Oprah Winfrey Show."  Trump had originally appeared on the show to promote a new book and discuss his life as a businessman, but the conversation soon turned toward foreign policy and how Trump would take a tougher stance with America's allies.


"I'd make our allies pay their fair share. We're a debtor nation; something's going to happen over the next number of years in this country, because you can't keep going on losing $200 billion," he said on "The Oprah Show" back then. "We let Japan come in and dump everything right into our markets... They come over here, they sell their cars, their VCRs. They knock the hell out of our companies. And, hey, I have tremendous respect for the Japanese people. I mean, you can respect somebody that's beating the hell out of you, but they are beating the hell out of this country. Kuwait, they live like kings… and yet, they're not paying. We make it possible for them to sell their oil. Why aren't they paying us 25 percent of what they're making? It's a joke."



The rant -- which carries the same blunt tone as Trump's 2016 run -- prompted Oprah to ask the question that people would ask for the next few decades.


"This sounds like political, presidential talk to me," she said. "I know people have talked to you about whether or not you want to run; would you ever?" 


"Probably not," Trump responded. "But I do get tired of seeing the country get ripped off… I just don't think I have the inclination to do it."


Of course, he couldn't help but hedge.


"If it got so bad, I would never want to rule it out totally, because I really am tired of seeing what's happening with this country," Trump said. "We're really making other people live like kings, and we're not."


He wasn't interested in running for president back then, but that didn't stop the mogul from predicting how he'd fare if he did enter the race.


"I think I'd win," Trump said. "I'll tell you what: I wouldn't go in to lose."


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